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Two speed spinning reel


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#1 Kilsong

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Posted 25 December 2011 - 08:26 AM

Some start talking about two speed reels recently.
First of all, do we need two speed reels ?
Shimano Stella has high gear ratio reel, 18000SW(5.7:1) and 20000SW(4.4:1)

While jigging, I found my JM PE reel which has 4:1 gear ratio is good enough for jigging and popping for any fish and I don't feel I need two speed reels.
In fact, I tested Accurate 600 two-speed for years.

How do you think ?

#2 Jorge Fidalgo

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Posted 25 December 2011 - 11:27 AM

Kil, I have to agree with you. I have used 2 speed reels and I do not find them necessary for most fish and fishing situations. I find that in high speed they don't have enough torque and it gets very tiring just reeling your bait and on slow speed they are too slow and it takes forever to reel up.

I fish alutecnos gorillas and now jigging master and I feel that a 4.0:1 to a 4.4:1 is perfect for a small conventional reel. I got my first JM pe3 a few months ago and I love it and will get a pe5n and a pe7 very soon.

Saying this I feel it translates exactly the same to spinning reels, which is what I normally jig with.

"BTW I jig for bottom fish mostly and soak bait on the bottom, I do not have experience with Yellowfins/Bluefins"

#3 fishordie

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Posted 25 December 2011 - 01:56 PM

Here on the West Coast, fishing larger Tuna, 2 speed reels absolutely have their place. I have been doing this for 50 years and do not remember the Old Days as good ol days as it pertains to any aspect of fishing. 2 speed reels, better rods, better gear, better hooks, better line, better boats, better electronics, etc. have made today's experience even better. Having that low gear for use, even for a few seconds to get a few feet of line on a stubborn fish and turn its head, make life just a bit easier on giants or bigger tuna. The same can apply to a buttoned down reel when fishing close to structure.
Getting a big Grouper to turn its head away from line eating structure can be a big advantage. There are times an angler just cannot put that kind of beef into the fight and this is when that low speed can really help.

A 2 speed spinner could be interesting if the addition of the transmission or gear changing device does not impact how tough the spinner can be. Looking at the Fox line of 2 speed spinner my only concern is I believe the manufacturer is going to want to increase the diameter and possibly the shape of the crank arm as the pressures exerted by fisherman will increase dramatically with the lower gearing. As of now we really are not cranking a fully loaded spinner to gather line rather we are using technique and allowing the reel to just gather line onto the spool. With the low speed we may see more Muscling of the reel. It will be interesting to see where this thing goes.

As a Note: 2 speed spinners came out decades ago they just did not catch on nor were they as robust as they needed to be. These new machined from Billet spinners could be interesting. Time will tell.

JMHO

Happy Holidays to all

Jamie

#4 Kilsong

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Posted 25 December 2011 - 02:48 PM

As far as I know there are two company from Europe are selling two speed spinning reels.
One is World Fishing Tackle from Germany and the other is Fox Sportfishing in England.

Here is a review of two-speed spinning reel of World Fishing Tackle by Alan Hawk.

http://www.alanhawk....eviews/wft.html

I believe the orininator of multi speed spinning reel was ABU.
They developed three speed spinning reels which was way ahead of its time.

http://www.realsreel...999 Service.pdf

#5 Alan Hawk

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Posted 27 December 2011 - 01:13 AM

It's worth noting that both WFT and Fox don't make reels in Europe. They are made by OEM factories in Asia. I reviewed the first and have my eyes on the second to be tested in due time.

The Abu reel was a marvel indeed. Despite the Swedish markings on the gearbox, it was made in Italy. You can probably tell by looking at the handle which is identical to those of other Italian reels of the time such as Alcedo 2CS. The maker, Zangi, sold that 3 speed reel in Italy and France under the name V3. The reel was expensive and the gear shifting system was not very reliable, so Abu stopped selling them I believe around 1965-66.

#6 Alan Hawk

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Posted 27 December 2011 - 06:38 AM

There is a video of the two speed Fox on youtube

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fTW5OG-559g

I don't know about you, but the video looks very ridiculous to me. For a reel that is "Designed for high speed jigging in deep water" as their site says, it has the wrong speed. Try yanking a 250g jig 70-80 metres deep at 6.1 ratio and let's see how long you'll last. Add to that the reel's own weight of 40oz (I bet you the real weight is higher) and you'd be talking about virtual suicide.

And to complete the joke, the US dealer has posted the prices:

Tbe Stratos spin is $1,000 and the 2speed version is $1,500


Not even going to comment on the $1500 thing. But for the single speed version to be much heavier, holds less line, and produces less drag than the proven Japanese made Stella SW, yet sells for $50 more? I really wish I could ask them why would they think that anyone would choose to buy their reel. Seriously, what chain of thoughts they imagine would go through someone's head before he decides to buy it :blink:

#7 Kilsong

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Posted 28 December 2011 - 02:39 PM

Alan, thanks for your honest, professional opinions.
Everything is getting clearer now.

When I choose a conventional jigging reels, I just don't pay much attention if the reel is over 30 oz because how you get tired with 30 plus oz reel when you jig 10 plus hours.

I tested two speed reels for tuna jigging and found it is not necessary even for big fish.
If you don't use two speed properly, you have more chance to lose fish.
I found the optimum gear ratio for cranking power as well as jigging is 4:1 - 4.9:1 personally.

#8 Alan Hawk

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Posted 28 December 2011 - 05:05 PM

When I choose a conventional jigging reels, I just don't pay much attention if the reel is over 30 oz because how you get tired with 30 plus oz reel when you jig 10 plus hours.

I tested two speed reels for tuna jigging and found it is not necessary even for big fish.
If you don't use two speed properly, you have more chance to lose fish.
I found the optimum gear ratio for cranking power as well as jigging is 4:1 - 4.9:1 personally.


We are in agreement here on two things: I too don't care for any reel over 30oz. I'm quite able physically, yet fishing loses a part of its fun when you use a heavy reel that gives you even slight soreness at the end of the day.

When I fished two speed reels and hooked into large fish, I found that pumping the fish with the rod at higher speed was much easier than cranking the fish at low speed. Also when a fish suddenly swam towards me while on low speed it became really frustrating trying to reel as fast as a mad man to wind the slack line. So, some people find two speed reels to be helpful, but I am not one of them and will never be.

#9 J FLORES

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Posted 28 December 2011 - 05:25 PM

I played with this reel @ the ICAST show in Vega's this year...very heavy, and not smooth while reeling at all.

I also dont care for a two speed spinner.


Graet post!!




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